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Blue Lobster Robots

There was a period in Picasso’s life when all his paintings were dominated with blue. His Blue Period lasted only three or four years and was likely prompted by depression that he suffered at the time.


Many years ago, the Metropolitan Art Museum had an exhibit at The Venetian in Las Vegas where I saw Le Homard, aka The Blue Lobster. It was quite different from the cubist female drawing that often characterize his style. Le Homard became one of my favorite Picasso paintings. See: https://images.masterworksfineart.com/product/le-homard-the-lobster-c-1945-1/pablo-picasso-aquatint-the-lobster-1945-for-sale.jpg


Microsoft Bing Image Creator (BIC) has been getting a lot of press lately. Will AI replace artists? Will AI augment artists? While these are questions whose answer we can debate, I decided to check out BIC myself. One way to do that is to request an image that is highly unlikely to occur rather than one that would be reasonable (say, boy on a swing in the park). I used:

robots in tutus in the style of picasso blue lobster

BIC came up with these four images.





I don't know which artworks were used to create the artificial neural network that composed these image. I am not that familiar with artists to know what parts of each image are being synthesized from other art style. So I thought I ask BIC again to see if I would get these same images or something completely different. I did NOT expect to get the exact same thing because Generative AI shouldn't work like that. But I did get four images, each of which is a counterpart of the original four. Take a look and I think you'll see what I mean.


To my eye, the first set is better because images with odd numbers of components have more aesthetic appeal. Which do you like best?





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